Tag Archives: spices

In a purple mood for lemonade // Lila Limonadenlaune

sugar free fructose free fructose malabsorptionohne zucker fructosefrei fructoseintoleranz

Most of my recipes are a byproduct of me going nuts at the weekly farmers markets, buying more produce than I can handle. That’s why recipes such as this rainbow salad, which are designed to taste amazing, while coincidentally using up as much food as possible, are clearly among my favorites.

Today, instead of salad, I present you this basil lemonade
Um, is that supposed to be tasty?
Yep, very much so!

Purple basil, or thai basil, is vibrant in color and dulcet in taste. Add fresh lemon juice, powdered glucose and a pinch of anise, and you are set to go. It reminds me of ‘şerbet’, the refreshing, yet absurdly sweet lemonade from Ottoman times, that is still popular in Turkey to this day. But don’t worry, my blend is hardly as sweet.

It’s the perfect drink to ask summer for another extension. 

Recipe after the jump. There is a German version too …

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Devil’s Dung, certified fructose free // Teufelsdreck, garantiert fructosearm

Devil's Dung, certified fructose free // Teufelsdreck, garantiert fructosearmDevil's Dung, certified fructose free // Teufelsdreck, garantiert fructosearm

(Die Deutsche Version findet ihr wie immer im Anschluss an den englischen Text)

Last month I treated myself to a little something special. No, I didn’t visit any expensive restaurants, nor did I spend a day at a local Hamam (well actually, I did that too). I did however venture into the world of Ayurveda. Seriously? Ayurveda? Yes, seriously. At the end of the day everybody has their own idea of what a proper ‘treat’ should look like, right? And no, just to spoil the premature excitement and even though that would have been a nice treat as well, I didn’t spend 4 weeks at a yoga resort, meditating all day and sipping on one chai after another, as might be the common association when it comes to Ayurveda. (Note to self: Remember to travel to a distant place and meditate for four weeks someday). Anyway, my exploration into the field of Ayurveda was of course food related and came in form of an Ayurveda cooking class. It sounded interesting enough to make me get up very early on a Sunday morning and literally hop on a ferry to the Asian side of Istanbul.

The term Ayurveda translates to something like ‘wisdom of life’ and is known as a traditional Indian art of healing. Even though the Ayurveda teachings go way beyond just knowing how to nourish your body, that is the part I’ve been coming across quite often lately,which doesn’t come as a surprise. The teachings of Ayurveda seem to know it all, when it comes to calming down and healing a stressed stomach and an unbalanced digestion. And thus I embarked on a welcome excursion into an ancient knowledge promising to treat several unwelcome dietary symptoms. Who wouldn’t, right?

Needless to say, I was pretty excited about the upcoming class and looking forward to acquiring new insights and inspiring recipes, while happily munching on food all day long. My expectations were by far exceeded, thanks to Ulli, the very knowledgeable and kind Ayurveda expert and yoga therapist holding the class. In just four hours she introduced us to a broad palette of herbs and spices as well as to their individual and combined healing benefits. We also talked about sprouting and soaking and on how to make food easier on the stomach in general. Which might further emphasize why this class was invaluable to me. Even though I tend to choose my ingredients wisely when cooking at home, there are still some things that upset my tummy to a certain extent, though they shouldn’t according to so-called popular science. I’m sure that with Ulli’s advice I’ll soon be kicking some serious symptom butt. The best thing about the class though, was it’s simplicity. That’s what made the whole Ayurveda approach so appealing to me in the first place. Despite the many ingredients in use and the alternate approach to what most people dub a normal diet, it is highly applicable. Integrating certain ideas and ways of nourishing in my day to day food routine even felt easy and natural. After all, nobody’s asking you to turn into a fulltime Yogi, right? (I just wanted to make that clear in case this post was getting a bit too spiritual for you ;)

Such a long introduction and I still haven’t told you about the thing that got me most excited during the class, which was a malodorous, but promising ingredient by the distinct name of Asafoetida. Malodorous? You might ask. Well, a spice commonly known as devil’s dung does not necessarily provoke odorant thoughts of a beautiful flowery Spring meadow. Unless of course meadows full of dung are your thing. Asafoetida, aka devil’s dung or hing, has been a staple in medicinal history for centuries but is rarely found in most modern cuisines, except for maybe the Indian. But let me tell you why Asafoetida is of such interest to us FM’ers. I mean, who would voluntarily add something to a dish that smells of rotten eggs? Two words: Garlic & Onion. Seriously, I couldn’t believe my ears when hearing nor my tongue when tasting it. Sparingly used and when heated in some fat, Asafoetida loses its ‘sharp’ taste and releases subtle tastes of onion and garlic, without causing the painful symptoms and bloated stomach. In fact its effect is quite the contrary. It is known to calm the stomach and reduce flatulence. Would somebody responsible for causing this spice’s near passing into oblivion please raise their hand? It’s scandalous and I need someone to blame. More after the jump. There is a German version too …

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Spicy celery root fries with oriental yoghurt dip // Würzige Sellerie-Pommes mit orientalischem Joghurt-Dip

Spicy celery root fries with oriental yoghurt dip // Würzige Sellerie-Pommes mit orientalischem Joghurt-Dip

(Die deutsche Version findet ihr wie immer im Anschluss an den englischen Text)

If you take a closer look at my recipe list you might assume I have quite a sweet tooth. Sorry to disappoint you. Though it is true, I used to be a sugar addict, eating lots of sweets up until I was diagnosed with FM. Beyond any doubt, it is my fructose malabsorption I blame most for my sugar cravings. And believe me, I’m more than happy the cravings have finally ceased. Most of the dishes I cook at home are actually more on the savory side and I would always prefer a piece of fenugreek-goat-cheese on a slice of whole spelt bread over a cup of Häagen-Dazs ice cream. I’ve become a savory girl through and through. To prove that, in my future posts I want to share some more recipes catering to our savory cravings. Today’s recipe features one of my favorite winter foods, namely celery root or celeriac. Celeriac is a good substitute for grainy side dishes, as it is quite filling. Besides its health benefits I like the mild and slightly nutty flavor of this magic root. So let’s kick off the celery root season with some easy to prepare celeriac fries and an oriental spiced yoghurt dip!
Recipe after the jump. There is a German version too …

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Instafriday: Our First Week In Istanbul // Eine Woche Istanbul

Our first week in Istanbul was amazing. It actually feels like we didn’t do much, like in a productive manner. But when I look at the pictures from last week it feels like we walked the whole city (even though this is not remotely true). That’s why I decided to share a few of my instagram shots with you and introduce you to some popular Turkish food staples. Check out my instagram profile for more pictures. A nice weekend to you all.

Unsere erste Woche in Istanbul war atemberaubend. Wenn ich mir die Fotos von letzter Woche anschaue, fühlt es sich an, als ob wir die ganze Stadt durchlaufen und uns durch jedes Restaurant gefuttert haben. (In Wirklichkeit haben wir vielleicht gerade mal 0,001 % der Strassen gesehen. Wenn überhaupt.)  Heute gibt es daher lediglich ein paar erste Eindrücke aus Istanbul und eine kleine Einführung in türkisches Street Food und andere traditionelle Gerichte. Noch mehr Fotos findet ihr auf meinem Instagram-Profil. Habt ein schönes Wochenende!

Socuk – Turkisch sausage with garlic. Preferred way of eating: grilled on a sandwich or with scrambled eggs. // Türkische Knoblauchwurst. Lieblings Zubereitungsart: Gegrillt auf Tost oder im Rührrei.

Sucuk – Turkish sausage with garlic. Preferred way of eating: grilled on sandwich or with scrambled eggs. // Türkische Knoblauchwurst. Lieblings Zubereitungsart: Gegrillt auf Tost oder im Rührrei.

Türk Kahvalti – Turkisch breakfast: Sucuk, scrambled eggs, lots of cheese, olives and honey. // Türkisches Frühstück: Sucuk, Rührrei, viel Käse, Oliven und Honig.

Türk Kahvalti – Turkisch breakfast: Sucuk, scrambled eggs, lots of cheese, olives and honey. // Türkisches Frühstück: Sucuk, Rührrei, viel Käse, Oliven und Honig.

Gözleme ve Kumpir – Phyllo dough filled with feta cheese and baked potatoe with an innumarable number of toppings. // Teigrolle gefüllt mit Feta und Ofenkartoffel mit einer unzähligen Anzahl an Toppings.

Gözleme ve Kumpir – Phyllo dough filled with feta cheese and baked potatoe with an innumarable amounts of toppings. // Blätterteigartiger Teig gefüllt mit Feta und Ofenkartoffel mit einer unzähligen Anzahl an Toppings.

There is more…

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